Generally, when starting out or doing maintenance marksmanship training it is advisable to fire from 3-5 yards. This allows you to work on accuracy without problems from indoor range lighting or outdoor wind. When learning to fire at distances, start close and move incrementally to greater distances. The goal is to train yourself to believe that the ammunition does the work and the handgun is as reliable as your computer. You don’t shoot “harder” at distances, and you don’t shoot differently. The only problems unique to distance are wind, lighting, and vision. Everything else is a mechanical function and requires nothing more from the shooter than when firing at close range. So take it in small steps from 3 yards and learn wind, lighting and bullet drop. It’s that easy.

The Author
Al
Albert League is a former Marine and law enforcement firearm instructor who consults on a variety of security topics.